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Expert Opinion

Please don’t use these lines. Pretty please.

Especially if used in a way that becomes self-limiting.

1. “There are more than one way to do things.”

Of course there are, but please don’t imply they are all equal. The world is full of 2nd and 3rd rate ideas.

2. “You have to find a way that’s right for you.”

Certainly you do. Just don’t chose one of those 2nd or 3rd rate ideas.

3. “So-and-so has a different opinion on this.”

Ok.          

(pause) 

Everyone’s opinion is worth listening to, but everyone’s opinion isn’t based on the same experience, success, quality of information, etc. Consider the source.*

I respect my doctor … But not his opinions on teaching brass.

Listen to an expert within a specific topic ….. i.e., You wouldn’t ask me how to teach drumline. At least you shouldn’t.

*This is also why I dislike anonymous online playing/teaching advice.

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FEATS IN BRASS
New York Brass Arts Trio
Joe Burgstaller, trumpet; David Jolley, horn; Haim Avitsur, trombone
Bach, arr. Jolley: CHACONNE from Partita No. 2, BMV 1004
Beethoven, arr. Avitsur: TRIO, Op. 87
Bartok, arr. Jolley: ROMANIAN FOLK DANCES
Piazzolla, arr. Burgstaller: LIBERTANGO

The new CD “Feats in Brass” by the New York Brass Arts Trio is simply astonishing. This CD may possibly change your perception of what a brass trio can do. Three world-class brass performers demonstrating brilliant technic and superb stylistic taste on arrangements that are entertaining and fresh.
These New York musicians (and friends) are a virtuoso ensemble that clearly enjoy performing together. The quality of this project will come as no surprise, however, to listeners familiar with the individual member’s previous solo recordings as well as collaborations with other great ensembles, i.e. Canadian Brass and Orpheus Chamber Orchestra.
This is heart-felt music making that you will want to own. Highly recommended.
- Joe Dixon

[To order a copy, contact: Haim.avitsur@gmail.com - should eventually be available on iTunes]

FEATS IN BRASS

New York Brass Arts Trio

Joe Burgstaller, trumpet; David Jolley, horn; Haim Avitsur, trombone

Bach, arr. Jolley: CHACONNE from Partita No. 2, BMV 1004

Beethoven, arr. Avitsur: TRIO, Op. 87

Bartok, arr. Jolley: ROMANIAN FOLK DANCES

Piazzolla, arr. Burgstaller: LIBERTANGO

The new CD “Feats in Brass” by the New York Brass Arts Trio is simply astonishing. This CD may possibly change your perception of what a brass trio can do. Three world-class brass performers demonstrating brilliant technic and superb stylistic taste on arrangements that are entertaining and fresh.

These New York musicians (and friends) are a virtuoso ensemble that clearly enjoy performing together. The quality of this project will come as no surprise, however, to listeners familiar with the individual member’s previous solo recordings as well as collaborations with other great ensembles, i.e. Canadian Brass and Orpheus Chamber Orchestra.

This is heart-felt music making that you will want to own. Highly recommended.

- Joe Dixon

[To order a copy, contact: Haim.avitsur@gmail.com - should eventually be available on iTunes]

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Tools of the Trade.
© Joe Dixon 2013

Tools of the Trade.

© Joe Dixon 2013

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We strive for technic that exhibits both grace and agility; technic that demonstrates comfort with ourselves as well as a oneness with our instrument.

We work to discover an expressiveness in interpretation that goes beyond the ink on a page; an expressiveness that creates a lucid connection between composer, performer, and audience.

We try to instill an enthusiasm for our instrument in others.

But most importantly, we seek a sound, the voice in which we fall in love.

- Joe Dixon, Notes to a Young Teacher

© 2012

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Informal portrait of Baldvin, my young Icelandic trumpeter friend.
© Joe Dixon 2012

Informal portrait of Baldvin, my young Icelandic trumpeter friend.

© Joe Dixon 2012

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10 Essentials for a Practice Environment

Practice is discovering and solving musical and technical issues, both physical and mental. If you are not doing this, you are not practicing.

Make practice sessions more productive by organizing in advance:

1. Have a quiet space that is free from interruptions.

2. You need a music stand for proper posture. Do not use an instrument case, your bed, the floor, etc.

3. Have a chair that is like you would use in performance. Do not use a bean bag chair, recliner, sofa, the floor, or a chair with arms.

4. Create and keep updated a chart of all skills and literature that you should be practicing.

5. Keep all of your practice material / literature organized and within easy reach.

6. Always have a pencil. Use it.

7. Keep a Practice Journal. Track your discoveries, new ideas, and reminders. Log your metronome markings.

8. You need a metronome. Use it LOTS.

9. You need a tuner. Use it LOTS.

10. Have a way to record yourself. EVERY DAY. Listen back with your audience’s ears.

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Excellence often requires attention to common sense, not just the profound.
— Joe Dixon
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I love New York.
© Joe Dixon 2010

I love New York.

© Joe Dixon 2010

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Technique

Perfection of one’s technique is essential, but not as an end unto itself. Technique is the servant of musicianship.

Superb technique can clearly communicate ideas of substance.

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Still pleading for conceptual awareness of the difference between singing and yelling. And the difference isn’t volume. Try to hear lyricism.